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What use does a civilian have for the skills of a designated marksman? Do we need to build a specialized rifle? Read up at www. looserounds. com Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print visit website.

How Does the DMR Concept Apply to the Prepared Civilian? at Looserounds.com

How Does the DMR Concept Apply to the Prepared Civilian? at Looserounds.comWhat use does a civilian have for the skills of a designated marksman? Do we need to build a specialized rifle? Read up at www.looserounds.com Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print visit website

Trijicon RMR vs Vortex Venom Sights: Head to Head Comparison

Trijicon RMR vs Vortex Venom Sights: Head to Head Comparison

What do you get when you put two of the best selling handgun sights head to head?  For me, it is an unparalleled experience.  Adding a holographic red dot sight to any gun is a big step and not a choice that many casual shooters choose. There are pros and cons to such a step but that is another article.  This one is about the optics , Trijicon RMR vs Vortex Venom. Let’s get to the head to head. Quick Navigation Vortex Optics Venom Red Dot Sight Review Features of the "Vortex Optics Venom" Red Dot Sight The Technical Side of the Story – Specifications Trijicon RMR Type 2 6.5 MOA Red Dot Review Features of the Trijicon RMR Type 2 Sight Getting Technical about the Trijicon RMR 6.5 MOA LED Red Dot Sight On To The Range – The Real Test and Impressions My Impressions – Getting the Feel What I DIdn’t Test – Durability Trijicon RMR vs Vortex Venom: Side-by-Side Comparison The Downside for a Pistol Optic (My Opinion) The Final Word Vortex Optics Venom Red Dot Sight Review Vortex optics entered the firearms optics business in 1986.  Vortex is a family-owned, American based company that headquarters in Wisconsin. Initially, the business was a small outdoor retail business, but, with the introduction of their first line of Vortex Optics in 2002, the floodgates opened.  Vortex optics are now a mainstay among shooters not just in the U.S, but across the globe. The Vortex Optics Venom came to the market to compete with the top-line red dot pistol sights such as the Trijicon RMR.  There is no doubt that Vortex Optics knew the playing field and brought the features to compete.  From the precision machined housing to features such as the top-loading battery compartment, Vortex Optics proved that its understanding of what shooters want is exemplary. From the shooter’s perspective, the Vortex Optics Venom package is tailor-made for accuracy and versatility.  Power controls and dot-intensity controls are located on the left side of the sight and are recessed to prevent inadvertent changes.  The 1 MOA windage and elevation adjustments ensure the versatility across many distances.  Included with the package is a Weaver/Picatinny mount that weighs in at only 1.6 ounces. Features of the Vortex Optics Venom Red Dot Sight All glass-to-air surfaces receive multiple anti-reflective coatings to increase light transmission under even the most severe conditions The Venom Sight has one of the widest lens fields of any red-dot sight on the market Settings allow ten levels of brightness, which can be controlled manually or set by the auto mode. Parallax free operation for quick and easy sight acquisition The chassis of the Venom sight is machined from a single piece of aircraft-grade aluminum Each lens on the Venom sight gets a treatment of Vortex Optics “ArmorTek” scratch-resistant coating The auto-shutdown feature avoids dead batteries. Battery life of up to 30,000 hours is possible when using the lowest intensity setting.  At the highest intensity setting, battery life is still 150 hours. The battery compartment opens from the top of the sight chassis.  A top-mounted battery compartment allows battery changes without removing the sight from the gun. "The Technical Side" of the Story – Specifications 1x magnification 6 MOA dot size 1 MOA adjustments on elevation and windage 130 MOA maximum elevation adjustment 100 MOA maximum windage adjustment Parallax free optics CR 1632 battery Length Overall – 1.9 inches Width Overall – 1.11 inches Height Overall –  1.02 inches Eye relief – Unlimited Included in the box Weaver/Picatinny mount T-15 Torx wrench Rain Cover Lens cloth Mounting screws screwdriver The one complaint about the Vortex Optics Venom red dot sight is the CR 1632 battery.  The CR 2302 battery is the more popular size of button battery used in most other electronic sights, binoculars, and some earmuffs.  Having to keep a different size battery is a sticking point for some users. Vortex Optics Venom Red Dot Sights See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 11:28 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Trijicon RMR Type 2 6.5 MOA Red Dot Review Ask any combat veteran which sight they want on their rifle and Trijicon is almost always near the top of the list.  Trijicon’s reputation for reliability and rugged construction tell the tale.  The RMR Type 2 6.5 MOA adjustable LED sight is a perfect example of Trijicon’s commitment to building superb optics. Trijicon is probably best known for its ACOG sight, which has proved itself over and over in multiple combat situations as well as with civilian hunters.  The introduction of the RMR pistol sights was marked by a milestone when the Trijicon RMR was named “Optic of the Year” by the Firearms Marketing Group in 2009. Proven reliability and upgraded electronics are the foundation of the Trijicon RMR Type 2 6.5 MOA red dot sight. Explicitly designed to ride on the slides of modern handguns, the RMR sight features a patented housing design and mil-spec electronics. Such innovations as push-button illumination control for easy and quick transitions from indoors to outdoors is a hallmark of the Trijicon design.  The RMR sight allows manually adjusted red dot intensity or the built-in automatic compensator will handle the chores as necessary. The Trijicon RMR shows its military heritage by including illumination settings compatible with night vision devices. Its features list evidences the Trijicon devotion to rugged, dependable operation. Features of the Trijicon RMR Type 2 Sight 1x magnification 6.5 MOA dot 1 MOA adjustments on windage and elevation Extended battery life of 4 years at setting 4 of 8 Patented housing design helps prevent lens damage even from drops and impacts Multi-coated lenses for true-color and distortion-free light transmittal Top and side-mounted windage and elevation controls don’t require special tools or removing caps Tritium-phosphor lamp and fiber-optic systems that automatically adjust the brightness level to match the available light conditions Side-mounted buttons mean quick and easy manual adjustments of the illuminating LED Multiple platform versatility allows mounting on pistols, rifles, and shotguns. Waterproof to twenty meters Trijicon Limited Lifetime Warranty Getting Technical about the Trijicon RMR 6.5 MOA LED Red Dot Sight Length overall – 1.8 inches Width overall – 1.1 inches Height overall – 1 inch Weight –  1.2 ounces Battery – 1 CR 2302 Adjustments – 1 MOA per Click Forged and machined aluminum housing Included in the box 1 Cr 2302 battery 2 RMR screwHex Wrenches RMR manual Trijicon Sticker Warranty Card For those of you who are Glock or Springfield shooters, a Trijicon RMR mounting kit adapter purchase is necessary to mate the RMR mounting system to either the Glock MOS system or the Springfield QSP pistol. The most voiced complaint about the Trijicon RMR red dot sights is the bottom battery compartment.  The sight must be unmounted to change the battery.  The long battery life mitigates this problem to a certain degree, but for a gun meant for use in combat situations, this seems to be an oversight. Trijicon RMR Type 2 6.5 MOA Adjustable LED Red Dot Sight Battery Life Over 4 years of continuous use (when used at 70ºF (21ºC)) at setting 4 of 8. Extreme... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 11:38 / Affiliate links / Images from "Amazon Product Advertising" API On To The Range – "The Real Test" and Impressions The real test of any gun accessory, especially sights and optics, is in the shooting and testing.  I suppose to be really accurate, we should have had identical guns on which to mount our test sights, but what we had is what we shot.  In this case, the platforms were a Glock 19 fitted out with the Trijicon RMR and a Canick mounting the Vortex Venom. I put about 200 rounds through each pistol at identical distances onto standard silhouette targets.   The test drill was to fire a sequence of 50 rounds of timed accuracy shots.  I then moved to targets that ranged from 7 to 25 yards.  The targets were engaged in various sequences that required acquiring the targets at different distances in different orders.  My goal was to test how well each red dot optic allowed me to compensate for recoil, muzzle bounce, and moving from target to target. My Impressions – Getting the Feel The initial 50 rounds proved to me that both of these sights in the hands of a semi-skilled shooter (like me) can make an unbelievable difference.  Either one of these sights makes a considerable difference in the ability to maintain a sight picture and to bring the red dot back onto the sight after a shot. I was afraid that after shooting for many years with open sights, the transition would be difficult.  It turned out to be not as big of a transition as I thought.  I will say that I usually shoot a pistol with both eyes open, so that may have made it easier. To my 66-year-old eyes, there was no discernible difference in the sight pictures through the glass of the optics.  Someone with younger, more acute vision may be able to see a difference but for me, there was none.  Both sights offered clear fields of view with no distortion or glare. The next round of shots required that I move from target to target set at various distances.  Moving between different distances required not only reacquiring the sight picture, but refocusing on targets at different distances as I moved.  Here, the Vortex Venom sight gained a small advantage.  The slightly larger field of view allowed me to find the target faster and get the dot where it needed to be with less trouble. What I DIdn’t Test – Durability Suffice it to say that financial implications kept me from testing what could be a deciding factor in a sight that might ultimately be used on a combat handgun, the issues of durability.  Testing these two sights to failure in drop tests just wasn’t an option.  However, just looking at the two sights, I have to give the edge to the Trijicon. I also have to judge based on reputation.  Trijicon has a record proven in combat.  Trijicon is a supplier for the military. Their sights have been in combat all over the planet since their introduction.  The reputation among warriors who have used these sights is well known. The Trijicon looks more robust and seems to be a bit more heavily built.  I suspect that this would have a significant advantage over the Vortex in a drop test. If durability and ruggedness are something that you must have, the Trijicon probably is a better choice. Trijicon RMR vs Vortex Venom: Side-by-Side Comparison Trijicon RMR Type 2 Vortex Optics Venom Width of Field at Sight .97 inches 1.11 inches Weight 1.2 ounces 1.1 ounces Magnification 1X 1X Battery CR 2032 CR 1632 Battery Life 4 Years Continuous Use at setting 4 of 8 at 709 degrees F. Up to 30,000 hours on the lowest setting and 150 hours at the highest setting Mounts Trijicon RMR mount Weaver/Picatinny Mount Waterproof Yes. To 66 feet for one hour No The Downside for a Pistol Optic (My Opinion) As good as they are and as helpful as they can be, there are certain shortcomings to mounting an optic on a pistol meant to be a concealed carry firearm.  The addition of that optic on top of the pistol creates some challenges. Holsters – It can be hard to find a concealed carry holster that will accommodate a pistol with a mounted optic.  There are some custom made holsters and a few manufacturers make holsters for the better-known brands of optics. Concealment – You don’t see many compact or sub-compact pistols sporting a red-dot sight.  The mounting requirements for most red-dot sights require a full-size slide, which means that if you want to conceal carry a pistol with a red-dot sight mounted, you must conceal a much bigger object. Security – Mounting a red-dot optic on the slide of your favorite pistol often means that you are relegated to a holster that is not as secure as some people might want.  There are level 3 and level 4 security holsters that will accommodate pistols with mounted sights, but they are usually sight brand specific. On the other hand, if you are a regular participant in the various pistol shooting competitions that allow red dot sights, there is a distinct advantage to mounting a sight on your favorite handgun. The other gorilla in the room is the cost associated with the sight and the mounting.  Many pistols are not factory equipped with mounting holes or they use a proprietary mounting system that requires adapters to mount the Trijicon or the Vortex.  These are all added expenses that you should consider. "The Final Word" All said and done, my recommendation for the average shooter who wants to mount a red-dot sight on their favorite pistol is the Vortex Venom .  For the price, most shooters will never be able to tell the difference in the performance of these two sights. On the other hand, if you are law enforcement or involved in any other job where you may experience combat conditions, the Trijicon is the obvious choice.  When your life may depend on your equipment, you want the best and tested option. I hope this look at the Trijicon RMR and the Cortex Optics Venom sights has helped you gain a better understanding of how these two exceptional optical systems stack up against each other.  If you have comments, observations, or experiences you would like to share, please make use of the space below in the comments section. Other interesting articles: Morakniv Bushcraft vs Companion Survival Knife: 2020 Head-to-Head Review Ultimate Guide to The Best Shotgun Sights Survival Gear Review: Vortex 8×36 Solo Monocular Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network vs USCCA: CCW Insurance Comparison

Blaser Offers .338 Lapua Option in R8 Long Range

Blaser Offers .338 Lapua Option in R8 Long Range

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d4f5448b_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d4f5448b_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Blaser R8 Long Range rifle comes in two stock styles. The GRS (left) is designed for competition, while the Professional Success stock (right) is geared more for hunting. Blaser has matched up its speedy straight-pull action with the accuracy of the .338 Lapua to make what looks like one heck of a long-range rifle. When it comes to manually cycled rifles, one company has more than made a name for itself. Blaser has gained world renown for producing some of the fastest bolt-action guns available today. And the German gun maker is once again mating its speedy straight-pull action with one of the most popular long-range cartridges available today. Blaser has expanded its R8 line of rifles to include .338 Lapua Magnum and has been titled as the R8 Long Range. And while this chambering is new for this particular series, it is not for the company. Related GunDigest Articles Know Your Cartridge: . "338 Lapua Magnum" .338 Lapua Mag: The Ultimate Long-Range Round? Straight Shooter: Blaser R8 Professional S Review The gun maker has had a long history with the precision round, perhaps best known example being its Tactical 2 model. But the company has gone quite a different direction with its most recent venture into .338 Lapua. The new R8 is a break from the Tactical 2’s tactical design. This is most notable in the rifle’s stock options; the Professional Success is a thumb-hole stock designed for hunting and the GRS has a modified pistol grip and is tailored for competitive shooting. Blaser has outfitted its new rifle with a 27-inch barrel, long enough that it should help the .338 round achieve its full ballistic potential. It has also been optimized in balance to ensure that the gun is responsive and easy to hold on target.

Improved Battle-sight Zero

Improved Battle-sight Zero

IBZ stands for Improved Battle-sight Zero. The common drum elevation adjustable rear sight can be tuned to achieve some great versatility. The method for adjusting  for A2 and A3 drums is a simple process. Before we begin remember that a detachable carry handle on a 20 inch barrel translates to a 1/2 MOA adjustment for windage and elevation. This makes a flat top 20 inch rifle with a rear drum a *very* precise machine. Contrast that to a fixed carry handle which adjusts against 1 MOA clicks for both windage and elevation. This doesn’t mean that A2 drums aren’t precise… but if you are going to give high power shooting or XTC a try with your fighting rifle *as is* then you would do best to take an A4 with detachable carry handle. What the IBZ does is allow for adjustments to be made below the 6/3 setting of the elevation drum. Instead of using the large aperture for 0-200 meters, you can configure your rear sight with the IBZ method and get a working 50 meter zero using the small aperture and yet retain the adjustments of 300-600 meters. The 50 meter zero is amazingly useful. At the apex of a 62 grain bullet’s flight path with a 50 meter zero you will see about 2 inches of bullet rise. The projectile will cross your line of sight again at 215-225 meters roughly. It will then drop from 4-6 inches right before it crosses the 300 meter mark. Simply re-adjusting to the 300 meter mark on the drum will alleviate that problem quickly. Here is a quick tutorial for the IBZ: Click on the first image to start the slideshow. To adjust a A2 upper for the IBZ set to – 2 clicks instead of the -4 clicks above. While the Revized IBZ is also popular at the moment I find that the IBZ is simple enough and that tuning the drum even more to get a 50 and 100 yard zero seems unnecessary. For targets at 100 meters I simply use  a 6 o’clock hold with a -4 click setting. Furthermore adjusting a carry handle (or A2 drum) past -4 clicks can put us into potential error territory. If I want a 50 meter zero I simply use IBZ and bottom out my drum. It wont go past -4 clicks so I can’t go past or screw up my very useful 50 meter zero. If I were to use RIBZ i could adjust to -6 clicks below my 6/3 mark on my detachable carry handle. All that just for a 100 meter zero. No thanks! The IBZ is simple, relevant, and the 50 meter zero is a great zero for the 5.56 cartridge. I hope you don’t need much more convincing if you haven’t done this already. 🙂 Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Tips to consider while purchasing rifle scope

An Optic is arguably the single most important accessory for a firearm. After all, you can’t expect to hit a target if you can’t see it fully and clearly. With the increased visibility provided by the right optics for your particular firearm, you’ll have a much greater chance of solidly hitting your target. It’s easy to feel confused when buying a best rifle scope or other shooting optics for the first time. What do all the numbers mean? Is bigger always better? The market is literally flooded with hundreds of different scopes with varying powers, settings and features. However, choosing the right rifle scope starts with identifying your needs. If you’re looking for a new scope for your hunting rifle , then you’ll likely want one that’s capable of gathering as much light as possible. Deer and other big game can be the most active during the early morning and late afternoon hours, which happens to be when sunlight is limited. A rifle scope will illuminate the view of your target much better than the human eye in the same setting. Although the “normal” rifle scope isn’t technically considered night-vision, it does help to collect more illumination in semi-dark conditions. In addition to a rifle scope’s light gathering ability, you should also be aware of its magnification power. A higher magnification power allows for viewing targets at longer distances. Remember, though, just because you’re able to see a target at a certain distance doesn’t automatically mean your rifle is capable of hitting it at that distance. Most rifle scopes will have a label like 3x9x50, which means it operates at 9x magnifications and features an objective leans of 50mm. A bigger objective lens is usually preferred by most hunters, as it gives them a broader (wider) view at the target area. Some rifle scopes will feature an adjustable magnification power , which allows the user to raise or lower magnification based on the target’s distance. For instance, a rifle scope labeled 4.5x14x50 allows the user to adjust the magnification power by 14 times. It’s important to note that the higher magnification power a rifle scope has the less light it will gather. A common mistake hunters make is to choose a rifle scopes based on its magnification power alone. The truth is, however, that you don’t need a strong magnification power when you’re hunting in dense woods. A solid 3 or 4 power is all it takes to provide a crystal-clear view of your game, while also giving you a high level of light retention. In fact, when hunting in a more dense setting you might actually want to use binoculars instead of your rifle scope. This helps to minimize movement and allows for quicker response time when spotting your target. A rangefinder is also another useful tool when hunting game in open areas at long distances. Many people don’t realize just how much gravity affects a bullet’s trajectory at long distances. Unless the “gravity factor” is taken into account, the bullet isn’t going to hit the target; at least not where you aim. A rangefinder will help you compensate for gravity, or bullet drop by giving you an accurate distance to your target. You can then use this distance measurement to adjust where on the target you should put your scope’s reticle. by kennblanchard This post first appeared on http://blackmanwithagun.com Consider subscribing to our http://podcast.blackmanwithagun.com https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/black-man-with-a-gun/id267726144

How to Use Military Binoculars for Strategic Advantages in Hunting

Do you love bird watching or hunting? If you do, then you may have heard about binoculars. Binoculars are special telescopes that enable you to see objects that your naked eyes can’t normally see. These are particularly handy in bird watching and hunting as you are able to see the birds or the animal from far away. Some specialized items like military binoculars can measure the accurate distance between you and your target, which helps hunters shoot better. Additionally, the two mirrored telescopes in the binocular provides a three-dimensional image when compared to scopes or monoculars . The zoom can also be adjusted, which adds to the benefits. Due to their wide range of functionalities, most bird watchers and hunters prefer using the binoculars than a high-quality scope or a monocular. These can be a bit bulky and heavy, but the functionalities make up for the weight. What Are Military Binoculars? Military binoculars are one of the sturdy and powerful binoculars that you may find. As the name suggests, these are specially made for military use. This means that these are highly durable and can withstand dust, water and any other precarious situations. Just like the common binoculars, the military binoculars have the same structure and functionalities. The main difference between a military binocular and a common one is the durability. The military binoculars are also a bit more pricey than most of the common ones in the market. How to Use the Military Binoculars? Using a military binocular is just the same as using any other binoculars, but I’ve seen people using these wrongly a number of times which often ended up with them getting frustrated over their binoculars. You must know how to use these tactical binoculars properly to get the best results. To better facilitate your understanding about how to use these binoculars, we’ve come up with the steps to using a military binocular properly. Here is the step by step guide: Sale Bestseller No. 1 HUTACT Military Binoculars for Adults 10x50,... $199.99 $137.99 Buy on Amazon Sale Bestseller No. 2 Steiner MM1050 Military-Marine 10x50 Tactical... $659.99 $396.00 Buy on Amazon Sale Bestseller No. 3 USCAMEL 10X50 Marine Military Binoculars for... $217.69 $138.99 Buy on Amazon Step 1: Choose Your Binocular Choosing your military binocular is very important. You must know how much magnification the binocular achieves. The higher the magnification, the further you’ll be able to see. You must also know the diameter of the objective lenses and exit pupil so that you can determine how these binoculars perform in low lighting conditions. The lenses used in your military binocular must have a high-quality lens coating or must be made of high-quality plastic. The eyepieces of the binoculars must be further than 5mm from your eye. Also, try out the focusing nob to check if the binocular fits perfectly with your eye. Step 2: Calibrate Your Binocular This is the most important step for using your binocular. To calibrate your military binocular , you must at first locate the diopter adjustment ring. This is usually found in between the two lenses on the top of the binocular. Focus on the object that you’re looking at and turn the knob to get a clearer image. Take note that the diopter adjustment ring needs to be adjusted whenever you look at a nearer or far away object. When you get a clear and sharp image, you can stop turning the knob. You can also find another adjustment button which adjusts the focal length of the binocular. Play with these until you get the right match that fits your eye. Step 3: Start Exploring If you’ve chosen the military binocular which fits you and have already calibrated the binocular, you can start exploring the birds you intend to watch or the animals you intend to hunt. You can use these binoculars in even the roughest terrains, which means that you can take these with you wherever you go. Step 4: Cleaning the Binoculars These military surplus binoculars should be taken care of and must be regularly cleaned to ensure the best performance over a longer period of time. To clean these binoculars, you must at first rub off any dirt that protrudes on the lenses with a soft cloth. Never use a rough cloth for this process as you might scratch the lenses while you’re cleaning. After that, add some ethanol onto the lenses and slowly rub it with another clean, soft cloth. You can use small brushes to clean off the exterior. Step 5: Taking Good Care You must take good care of your binoculars to ensure that they last for a long time. You must always put on the protective covers on the lenses when you’re not using the binoculars. You must also never scratch the lens. Always store the binocular in a safe, dry place. You can put the binoculars in a binocular harness when they’re with you while you’re bird watching or hunting. Conclusion Military binoculars are incredibly powerful and versatile tools to use when bird watching or hunting. These are very sturdy and can perform a lot better than the standard scopes or monoculars. Knowing how to use military binoculars properly can make a big difference when you’re trying to focus on a distant object. You must know the binocular that you’re purchasing, calibrate the binocular properly and take proper care of the lenses and the binocular as a whole. If you know how to do all these properly, you can extract the most out of your binoculars. share share share share share

Summary

What use does a civilian have for the skills of a designated marksman? Do we need to build a specialized rifle? Read up at www. looserounds. com Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print visit website.